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a jokesly washington event. are told. looks like a lot of comedy. >> anything wrong with that? really.ot i think the reference he was making was to andrea mitchell and alan greenspan's wedding that had been held around then. they are a power couple. andrea mitchell is a great journalist. alan greenspan is one of our most powerful economic minds in the last decade. it is an interesting dynamic when you have this crossover between friendship and social life. the president of the motion picture association told you he would never lobby. >> he did. i think what chris dodd is theemented in this book is impermanent feudal class, which is a term that tom coburn uses. it is used to describe the impermanent of washington. a lot of elected officials go on to become lobbyists and consultants. frankly, life is pretty good inside the belt. >> let's watch this. >> "this town." >> mark leibovitch. >> "this town." >> d.c. is described as inflated by big-money. a humanor schumer -- ladle in the local soap celebration buffet. wow, mark. all kinds of reaction. taking down the preening egos of this town. the
of reaction. >> they are taking down the preening egos of this town. the washington post. >> i hear there is no index. we cannot find out what is going on in this work. >> this book was so widely anticipated in washington as a screaming indictment. >> washington has created a bootleg index. >> your colleague suggested the notion of the composition -- >> everyone is talking about the book. everybody thinks they are in it. >> why are people that you wrote about so happy about this book? >> beats me. what is interesting, a lot of what you are seeing there was done before we saw the book. the speculation took on a life of its own. look. it is nice to have a book the bull are talking about, and obviously what happens is people focus on who is up, who is down, what news has broken. ultimately -- i do know what people to miss the more serious point. washington is doing very, very well in a very gilded age in some ways while the rest of the country is suffering. >> any reaction you have had to the book, surprising? >> not really. look, when you write a book, a lot can go wrong. that is the
now, it just looked like a very friendly almost clubby washington event. jokes are told that looked like a lot of comedy. that's what i saw. >> anything wrong with that? >> no, not really. >> talking -- i think the reference they were making was andrea mitchell and al greenspan's wedding that had been held around then. look, they're a power couple. andrea mitchell is a great journalist and alan greenspan is one of the most powerful economic minds and forces in the last few decades. 's an interesting dynamic. had the crossover in the friendship between professional and social life and so forth. >> you write in there for instance, chris dodd, a senator then, now works for the professional picture association he wouldn't lobby. >> he did. now he's head of the most powerful lobbying organizations in washington. what it's emblem mattic of was this fuel class. it sort of described the permanence of washington, the fact that people come here -- they almost always say now a lot of elected officials go on to become lobbyists and consultants and frank is good inside the beltway. >> here's som
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
march on y of the washington. we will be joined by clarence lusane. ♪ashingt"washington journal" is. host: the lincoln memorial, a key part of the march 50 years ago, a key part of the event today. commemorating the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. live coverage starts at nine on c-span three, part of american history tv. we will devote part of this program to the topic of the march, as well as the civil rights act. for the first 45 minutes we are turning to politics. john boehner, in a conference call with republican lawmakers, told a group he plans to craft a short-term bill that would fund the government, avoiding a government shutdown. for our next 45 minutes, we are interested in hearing from republicans only. the acttalk about itself, the larger implications of the funding of the health- care law, but we want to get your thoughts on our phone line. here's how you can do so. it is republicans only. if you live in the eastern and central time zone, it is 202- 585-3880. if you live in the pacific or mountain time zone, it is 202- 585-3881. you can reach us on twitter
to go down fighting. >>> also said founder of amazon to buy "the washington post." what does that mean for the floundering legacy of the paper? the panel will weigh in on that. yes! one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues... with three strains of good bacteria. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. the beach on your tv is much closer than it appears. seize the summer with up to 50% off hotels at travelocity. there's a new way to fight litter box odor. introducing tidy cats with glade tough odor solutions. two trusted names, one amazing product. my electrolux french door refrigerator gives me a lot more entertaining possibilities. with features like the perfect temp drawer that has a wide variety of temperature settings, i can store anything from desserts to deliciously fresh seafood at the ideal serving temperature. so everything is perfectly fresh. tonight i'm using the just the two of us setting. electrolux. be even more amazing. see the electrolux kitchen and laundry appliance collection at the home depot today. >>
, straight-forward news". "accurate, responsible" says the washington post. and the baltimore sun says, "instantly engaging and powerful". al jazeera america, there's more to it. make sure that stories don't escape them. >> every day a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you heard angles you hadn't considered. consider this, antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo. stories that matter to you. saudi arabia for that. ♪ test test .. . .. . but should you be made aware if you are consuming them. that's next on "consider this." welcome back to al jazeera. members of congress are being briefed right now about syria. >> possibly to start the end of this week, about now. now things look so very different. the loyal britt whose have stood by the americans in iraq, and afghanistan will not be onboard, this time. so obama has to decide, i think, whether to go it alone with perhaps the support of the french. and it looks like there's no way he is going to have a u.n. security council mandate. i think part of the parliamentary debat
is speak the truth. secondly, there is a new generation of leaders stepping forward in washington. new, young at leaders, people like rand paul and marco rubio and mike lee and kelly ayotte. [applause] you know what is incredible? five years ago, not one of them was in office. you have to go back to after world war ii to see an instance where the generation of leaders who were effectively defending free-market principles is a new generation stepping forward -- let me suggest something. if you look at that new generation, they are almost always exactly the same age. was 10 whence, i ronald reagan became president. i was 18 when ronald reagan left the white house. know how for the world war ii generation, many of them would prefer to fdr as "our president?" i will go to my grave with ronald reagan defining what it means to be present. -- president. [applause] he didn't blink. i have referred to this next generation, this new generation as the children of reagan. listen to them communicate. listen to kelly stand up and talk about free-market principles. listen to marco. listen to rent. --
canceled his meeting with russian president vladimir putin. that is all next on "washington journal." ♪ is sunday,orning, it august 11 come up 20 13. it is today, resident obama began his week long vacation at martha's vineyard. today we will be discussing the state of u.s. relations with dive intoking a deep u.s. job numbers, and talking about recent al qaeda threats. before we do that we want to hear about the state of news media from our viewers. the pew research center's -- you research center released its biannual data and while there is still plenty of criticism about the industry, most americans continue to believe the media plays an important watchdog role. as we take you through that reports this morning, we want to hear your thoughts. he of us a call. we split our lineup -- we split our lines up by age group. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media sites, on twitter and facebook. you can also e-mail us at we want to take you to that report that was released on thursday by the pew research center for the people. public valuations
perez. o'bryan.teve ♪ tot: good morning, welcome "the washington journal." we are in the waning days of a congressional recess and members of congress are gearing up for this fall's legislative agenda. a question for all of you this morning, what is your message to house and senate lawmakers as they prepare to turn to -- returned to washington next month. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. also send as a tweet, if you go to or post your comments on or e-mail us at a piece this morning from janet hauck, a town hall meetings happening across the country, this is what she reports -- of color that is a bit on what is happening in town hall meetings across the country. here on c-span we have been those town hall meetings and if you are interested in watching them, you can go to before we came up live here we were showing you a recent town hall meeting with congressman justin [indiscernible] a republican who many of you know is against the nsa program. nsa,
/11. after the bell stunner, jeff bezos buys "the washington post" for $250 bucks. and the bankrupt city of detroit starts the process of putting its priceless museum artwork up for auction. you wouldn't believe how much it could be worth. all those stories and much more coming up on the "kudlow report" right now. good evening, i'm larry kudlow. this is the "kudlow report." first up tonight, breaking news, jeff bezos paying $250 million for "the washington post" newspaper. a few days ago boston red sox owner john henry bought the "boston globe" for the bargain basement price of only $70 million. what is going on here? why will these foes succeed while others have failed. joining us is our own julia boorstin. why will they succeed where others have failed in. >> i think the question is how do you define success? one thing jeff bezos makes very clear in his letter about this and it was also in the press release is that he's not investing this just as a financial endeavor but he sees this as supporting journalism. he says "i understand the critical role the post plays in washington, d.c. an
. >>> meanwhile, a stunner the world of media, washington post selling the newspaper publishing businesses including amazon to jeff bezos, and julia boorstin has more on that blockbuster deal. >> this news took everyone including editors and writer at the post by surprise. the washington post's company whose name will change saw the stock rise with caplan tech being sold and now what the billionaire icon plans to do with the newspaper. jeff bezos stressed what a newspaper plays in a free society, and he says that the newspaper's duty remain s s to readers and not the owner. the charting of the map ahead is not going to be easy, and there is a need to invent, which means we will need to experiment. and after knowing each other for a decade, this came together in the conference last month. >> we met at a conference fa face-to-face twice. the second week in july. we spent an hour together, and he asked for time to study the numbers, and then we spent another two hour s together, an at the end he said he wanted to go ahead. >>> that is hardly the first billionaire to buy into publish i ing. th
indicate military attacks are coming. >>> anniversary of the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. how president obama handles the hopes of the joshua generation. >>> plus as debt and a sense of despair looms large over motown, detroit's next mayor will be former hospital chief mike duggin or the man we'll meet this morning, wayne county sheriff benny napoleon. august 27th, this is "the daily rundown." lets get to my first reads of the morning. secretary of state john kerry laid out an aggressive case for intervention in syria arking evidence of the largest chemical attack in decades is undeniable. the latest escalation with a steady drum beat by the united states and its allies, which is clearly a leadup to military action. >> the killing of women and children and innocent bystanders by chemical weapons is a moral obscenity. president obama has made clear to the outside regime that this international norm cannot be violated without consequences. >> it's an important phrase. you heard it a lot, not just from john kerry but jay carney, international norm, significant, ready for str
jefferson, lincoln, washington had fought for. the only, i think, two pieces of oratory that would rival it would be fdr's, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself and president kennedy inaugural address. martin luther king joined the founding fathers 50 years ago today. >> reverend al sharpton obviously an important event 50 years ago. 50 years laterer there will be an african-american president going to commemorate this moment. what an extraordinary journey it has been and the journey, as you say every day and as all americans understand, the journey continues. what do you want to hear from the president of the united states today? >> well, i think that what we want to hear is a commitment to continue that journey but to also salute the fact that we have made the journey. we met with him two days ago after having a huge march on saturday about the issues now. and one of the things that i said is that i feel that he should not be compared to dr. king. he is the president. we want to hear from him as the generation before us heard from kennedy about what we are going to do. so i th
troops to general washington. there is no doubt this was a massive setback for the british war effort. but the fact remains that even surrendering 7000 troops to washington, the british still and tens of thousands of more troops in north america and they could have somebody tens of thousands of more troops from other parts of the empir empiref they had decided to do so. but they were not able to do so because of the power of a new force in insurgent warfare, a term that was only going to faithfully in 1776, the power of public opinion. now, if the founding fathers had been battling the roman empire i can assure you that the romans, no matter how many battlefield defeats they would've suffered, would have come back and george washington, the founders, would have been crucified quite literally. the fact that this did not happen is because of what happened in an institution that the roamers did not have to worry about, at least not after the rise of the empire. and that was the house of commons, parliament. in 1782, a year, in the year after the battle of yorktown it was a very close vot
. grew up in washington, d c -- d.c. she knew dolley madison when she was a little girl. they went to st. john's church on lafayette square. when she was 5-10 years old, she knew dolly madison. her father was a very famous naval commandants who took a ship on a commercial ship that went down. it was an act of bravery because he made sure that all the passengers on board got off a first. his widow and his daughter, their only child, then living in new york city were given all sorts of awards, a monument to him at annapolis naval academy. alan arthur is really interesting. she does not become first lady, but she influences the administration. very similar to racial jackson jacksonl the way that she was the ghost, the memory of her. chester arthur made several appointments, four we know of, specifically of people who had known his wife. one was a cousin in the office of the attorney general made assistant attorney general. another was in the treasury. it was very controversial that he named the superintendent of the naval academy, he appointed a friend of theirs, a childhood friend of his w
in washington, she took her sweets where she could find them. apparently she had her sons and others buy chocolate shells by the barrelful and she writes about the medicinal qualities of fudge. i mean it was as if she took it where she could find them. that's pretty pathetic. >> i would say that the shells are probably not bon-bons. she is not sitting on her sofa munching. they're the cocoa bean shell. you would steep them in hot water. it would be like coffee and you would add milk. she was interested in the medicinal qualities of it. i wouldn't go too far on john quincy's sourness. there is affection between the two of them and great love. otherwise she could have stayed in quincy. >> after they lost, i think, the daughter, is it true he gave her a book on the diseases of the mind? >> some months later, yes. >> it's the modernize, the insensitivity. he is certainly not a modern husband. louisa had by one count nine miscarriages. >> minimum five and a still birth, officially more. -- potentially more. they are sometimes hard to read into it because of how discreet they are with their la
electric grid. then a look at a recent survey on american's view on aging. "washington journal" is next. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioned by the national captioning institute] ♪ host: one of the more news headlines this friday morning said the u.s. is treading lightly as the prices deepens in egypt. this has nearly 600 people have been killed amid what are being described as ferocious clashes between protestors and security forces. and another headline says egyptians are bracing for more bloodshed today. to the question that's out there. should the u.s. cut off foreign aid to egypt. a lot of folks are saying that but so far, it hasn't happened. what do you think? call numbers on your screen. or you can put your voice on the program via twitter, facebook and send us an maul -- -- e-mail theere is the front page of "wall street journal" today. the lead headlines says egyptians are bracing for more bloodshed. there is a photo of egyptian soldiers guarding an area around a
in washington, just as they did 50 years ago to hear dr. king's historic "i have a dream" address. >>> and a mayor's mission to revitalize gary, indiana, a town that has long been down on its luck, now signs of hope and healing are everywhere. >>> good evening. that huge wildfire burning in central california is growing virtually unchecked tonight as its impact is being felt more than 100 miles away. far from the firefight, the city of san francisco is under a state of emergency tonight because its water supply and hydroelectric power come from a reservoir near the fire zone. 2,700 firefighters are now on the lines backed by a relentless air assault, but working again to rugged landscape and exhaustion. they have managed to contain only a tie knee piece of this fire. nbc's tom costello is in groveland, california, to bring us the very latest. tom, good evening. >> reporter: hi, lester. public utility crews say that they are confident they can maintain water and power to san francisco. this fire station behind me is serving as an information point so residents can get real time upt
not a political dispute but more interesting, the ambassador to washington came out with that statement that the egyptian government was trying or at least going to review the u.s. aid and that certainly caught a lot of people here by surprise. in recent days the egyptian government has been trying to assert more of its sovereignty. it's one of the things it's criticized for, over the years it was seen that it was somewhat of a lap dog on the u.s. government's hand because the former regime of hosni mubarak was so closely allied to washington. this government is trying to distance itself from any type of foreign interference particularly those critical of its actions. when it comes to those governments that have been very close or supporting the government's crackdown they have been welcoming them and that's caught some people here by surprise. another point that caught people here off guard was the reference to the fact hat the united states and the taliban have both expressed reservations in terms of what is happening here on the ground and that was a point that the foreign minister a
washington journal for august the third. potential attacks by al qaeda has part of the state department to issue a worldwide alert for travelers. the attacks may occur before the end of august with north africa and the middle east been the focus of that threat. wall street journal reporting that a bill is being proposed that would double the amount of guest worker visas. turning to the economy, the unemployment figure is at 7.4% with 162,000 jobs created in august. that is the economy nationwide. we want to get your take on the economy. is it getting better or worse yet go and how much washington how -- or worse yet go and how much does washington -- influence does washington have. again, for our first 45 minutes on the to get your take economy. you can call us on those lines. if you want to reach out to us on social media, twitter @ cspanwj. on facebook we have about 13 comments. you can always send us an e-mail at here are the figures from the front page of the wall street journal -- it also talks about the unemployment figure, standing at 7.4%. that is
. .. with the president to announce plans for the march on washington. in support of the civil rights act. >> june 12th, 1963 as everest was returning home for the naacp meeting member byron shot him in his driveway as he was getting out of his car. evers was killed instantly. ♪ ♪ >> randolph and fellow americans , the national urban league is honored to be a participant in this historic occasion. our presence here reflects not only the civil rights communities increasing the awareness of the urban league, but most important it says and i hope what and clear that while intelligence, maturity and strategy dictates a civil rights agency we use different methods and we are all united as never before on the goal of first class citizenship. >> to present to you the moral leader of the nation. i have the pleasure to present to you dr. martin luther king. [applause] i am happy to join with you today what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation. [applause] five years ago, a great american in the shadow we stand today signed the emancipation proclamatio
on washington and of course delivered the i have a dream speech. take a look at the front page of "the new york times." 1963. the language itself is just dramatic. you see the picture. it's funny to see on the left, president kennedy signed the bill to a vert a rail strike. kin did i was shot to death a few months later. the march helped pave the way for the civil rights act of 1964 and the voting rights act of 1965. it wasn't until the year 2,000 that all 50 states officially observed martin luther king dare. there are a number of events planned today. just before 3:00 p.m. president obama will speak at the lincoln memorial. preceding him will be speeches by former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton. and in exclusive video provided to "meet the press," president bill clinton took the opportunity to reflect on the march and martin luther king's legacy. >> on august 28th, 1963, i was 17 years old. i knew that martin luther king was scheduled to give the speech so i made sure i was home. it was during summer vacation between my junior and senior years in high school. so i was home sitting i
and smoke it, too. the feds will now let states decide on pot. >> i love seattle, washington, rocks. >> colorado, washington. >> they call it wake and bake. some wake up every morning. ♪ light up. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." >>> more on the doj pot decision a little later. good morning to you, i'm carol costello. first up, syria. president obama reaches out and u.s. allies back away. this morning an international coalition to support military strikes on syria is crumbling. the most stinging rejection from washington's closest ally. take a look at the cover of "new york daily news" the british aren't coming. british lawmakers voted against taking any part of any military action. other allies like germany and france are also gun shy, still haunted by the iraq war. those concerns echo loudly in congress where more than 160 lawmakers, both republicans and democrats, are demanding at least a full debate before any strikes are launched. last night, president obama and top members of his cabinet spent 90 minutes trying to rally support among skeptical lawmakers. >> the congress, l
, and then the third thing, deterrents. i have to say, i lived in washington, d.c. compared to new york city, bob, i would much rather be in new york city, much safer place than d.c. >> what is integral. >> are you kidding me? integral. you have to have it. >> i didn't know. >> remind us not to partner with you in scrabble. >> i don't even play scrabble. >> i played this weekend. >> did you? >> i did. >> first off, the reason why new york works and the other cities don't is because new york is better at it, they're not profiling nationality and color of skin, doing behavior. what they're doing is when you stop 5 million people, only have 10% result in arrest, good job. because what you're saying is you are deterring people from walking out with a piece because they could get stopped. they could say i am not going into that building, i don't like the behavior leading up to that. nypd will get in your face, say excuse me, can i talk to you a second. they will talk and search. real quick, rudy giuliani got us on the way, unbelievable progress, i witnessed it, 42nd street looked totally different. there
for a presidential medal of freedom? share with us this morning on "washington journal to go (202) 585-3880 four republican, (202) 585-3881 for democrats and (202) 585-3882 for independents. you can also e-mail us or send it via twitter, @cspanwj, or is our e-mail address. here is an article from the "hill" newspaper. host: andy 16 recipients for the newest batch of presidential medal of freedom honorees, president oakland the, opera daniel, sally ride, bayard loretta lynn, kahneman,niel patricia ward, arturo sandoval, gloria steinem, ernie banks. post"rmer "washington editor receiving the medal of freedom. it says here 91 years old, who remains a vice president at large at the newspaper. respected for his tenure at the editor from 1968 through 1991 during the paper's heyday. some of the other nominees, other winners this year are the late senator daniel anyway of nouye of- i host: 202 is the area code or who would you nominate for the presidential medal of freedom? (202) 585-3880 for republicans, (202) 585-3881 for democrats, and (202) 585-3882 for all oth
. he is aligned with solutions. that lineve to have of thinking in washington dc. it comes to solutions, what do you think he offers to problems that in your mind exists? he addresses personal responsibility, which our country needs more and more. the -- makes people are a silly responsible. you can take a look at his life and past experience. he came from a poverty situation and is one of the most successful success stories in the united states. he would be a fantastic leader for us at this time. host: how did he come to your attention? every time he speaks he just reinforces in what i believe and have come to believe. he has common sense with his answers and thoughts. , as far as heon goes, he has appeared several times on this program. if you want to stay -- if you want to see things he's said or speeches he's given, i invite you to go to our video library. you can see our archive of what's available about the person. washington dc is up next, democrats line, anthony. caller: good morning. being a democrat i honestly believe hillary clinton is going always iood -- he has believe -- r
is this time for the president? congress is away from washington, members are in their home district. in the last couple of weeks of august, what can he do having the stage to himself here in washington? guest: this is a usual trend for the president over the summertime. his approval ratings have dipped. is -- right now he has the stage to himself. it is critical and hard to overstate the importance of framing the message ahead of these fights. we have seen the polls over the summer. when it comes to the budget showdown president does have an advantage. it it is important for the white house to hold onto this advantage ahead of the fight with congressional republicans. negotiations continue over the budget and of course the debt ceiling. host: she is the deputy white house editor for politico. give us the latest on the white house and the situation in egypt right now. is -- the president only public statement he gave is about egypt. we are seeing the white house handing a no good options for the president, increasing congressional pressure to cut off age up entirely. we are continuin
] [inaudible conversations] >> as we approach the 50th anniversary of the march on washington and martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech, the good jobs nation coalition hosts a discussion this afternoon on civil rights and economic inequality. speakers include civil rights leaders, labor activists and low-wage workers and the relevance of dr. king's vision today. it's live at 6 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. and tonight booktv in prime time continues. beginning at 8 eastern with jeff scherrer on a chain of thunder. at 9:05, ishmael beah talks about his second book, "radiance of tomorrow." at 9:20 from booktv in london, a discussion with biographer herr myny lee. and at 9:50 best with selling author hah led hosseini on his most recent book, "and the mountains echoed." booktv tonight at 8 eastern here on c-span2. >>> shifting gears to politics, democratic candidates running for new york city mayor take part in a debate ahead of the city's september 10th primary election. watch live coverage beginning at 6 eastern today on our companion network, c-span. >>> early on, you know, we said, okay
made in washington and agreed by the government here, then that's really why we're here, because washington feels there should be some bombs falling this weekend. now, many atrocities have taken place in the last two years since the conflict began. shirley, those seeking to take military action could wait a few days longer to assure that the facts are straight but it's obvious there's no threats to this journey of the uk that we know that the government seeks military action in order to deter and undermines chemical weapons, that's fine. that it may well see, that's fine, although military action has to be sanctioned by law. but surely, it should wait until the full conclusive proof is available their fight by the >> that has descended the civil war. the recent spill regarding militant objection has been confusing. last friday at united states and the uk governments were pressing for weapons inspectors to be allowed in c. on monday the inspector general's went albeit in difficult circumstances but on monday evening all indications were that the u.s. and uk had made up their minds
on the "washington journal." later withk about it two members of congress. here is the front page of the morning --imes" this rifts latecomer suspending impasse. host: representative steny hoyer of maryland, the number two house democrat host: this is how the "new york times" concludes its front page article -- host: that again it's from the "new york times." here is the "wall street journal" specifically on a spending bill issue that came up this week. senate spending bill blocked host: well, we want to get your views on the federal budget and the process as the congress gets ready to recess. they are in today, and after that, five weeks off. the federal budget is uncertain as congress recesses. for republicans, (202) 585-3880 for democrats, and (202) 585-3882 for independents. you can also contact us through social media, @cspanwj is our twitter and appeared you consider e-mail if you'd like to "hill" newhe'll" -- savor this morning host: that is from the "hill" newspaper. and from "politico" this morning -- john boehner calls for a short-term continuing resolution. here's
recess. president obama is in washington today, scheduled with meetings with senior advisers. are on alert after terror warnings from the state department and terror officials. you'll get more on that this morning. we want to focus on the top federal budget questions that congress will have to address when it returns next month. today,ominent voices including david petraeus, are calling for a compromise. and eric cantor went on one of the sunday on one of talk shows to tell what his view might look like. we want to ask you whether you believe a copper rises possible and how much copper mines would you be ok with? the phones are open. republicans can call at yashin that -- republicans can call at -- you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social atia sites or e-mail us a good monday morning to you. i want to take you to the opinion piece by david petraeus and a senior fellow at the brookings institution. this is in "usa today." the headline -- that is the opinion piece in "usa today." eric cantor went on fox news sunday to talk about the idea
was hearing on mr. summers preemptively, which is sort of a standard washington exercise, that i don't like him. because when someone has worked hard for me and on behalf of the american people and i know the quality of those people and i see them getting slapped around in the press for no reason even before they have been nominated for anything, then i want to make sure that somebody is standing up for them. i felt the same way when people were attacking susan rice before she was nominated for anything. so i tend to defend folks that i think i've done a good job and don't deserve attacks. my main criteria for the federal reserve chairman is somebody who understands they have to do a mandate, a critical part of the job is making sure that we keep inflation in check, that our monetary policy is sound, that the dollars sound. those are all critical components of the job and we see what happens when the fed is not paying attention. we saw prior to paul volcker coming into place inflation shooting up in ways that really damaged the real economy. but the other mandate is full employment. and rig
archives. tomorrow on washington journal, americans protest the reform president -- discuss the repeal the healthcare law for one year. then, he looks at his network latest series, in thing on inequality in the u.s. justices him. after, as manager of education we talked about, and for standards initiative and how it plays into the overall education in the u.s. "washing journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. season two of "first ladies" begins monday, september 9 with a look at the life of roosevelt. encore presentations of season one. each weeknight at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span, programs on every first lady. during tonight's encore presentation of our "first ladies" program, a story and will answer your questions about julia tyler at span. ♪ [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> she was not happy her husband had been elected president. she never made it to washington. >> when he resigned, he and his wife and their family moved here to williamsburg. it was here that letitia tyler
from the national center for education statistics. "washington journal" is next. ♪ friday,ning, it is august 30, 2013. even as the british parliament voted not to join the u.s. in a possible strike. while administration officials said last night that the u.s. is considering taking unilateral action in response to a reported chemical weapons attack on syrian civilians and rebels last week, some congressional leaders said the white house has more work to do in making its case. as we take you through the latest developments this morning, we want to hear your opinion on what you think the american public needs to know before america -- before president obama takes action. give us a call on the republican democrats, and independents, the numbers are listed on the screen. if you are outside the u.s., it 585-3883. you can also catch us on twitter and facebook or e-mail us. a very good friday morning to you. i want to take you right to the headlines about syria and possible u.s. involvement today. here's the front page of "the new york times." to one of those british newspapers, "
surveillance and human rights. on the next "washington journal," we'll discuss north carolina's new voter identification law in light of the supreme court's decision to strike down the parts of the voting rights act. our guest is myrna perez. we'll also be joined by lock heed martin vice president steve o'brien to discuss the uture of the company's joint strike fighter. the pentagon is planning to use more than 2,400 of the advanced technology aircraft in all branches of the military. at an estimated cost of $1.5 trillion. earlier this year on c-span's q&a d, a reporter discussed his trip to the lock heed martin ighter demonstration center. >> to sit in a flight simulator that they have. >> where? >> very interesting question. just across the river this crystal city, virginia. not more than a 10-minute car ride from capitol hill. and it's part of their flight demonstration center. it looks like a futuristic kind of museum and it's a place where not just journalists can go but members of congress and their staff members and other government officials. and so it's a chance to show off the v
as the international community. here are the lines on the screen. here is the front page of "the washington post" this morning. obama weighing limiting strike on syria. they say the president is wearing a strike syria that would be a limited scope and duration, designed to serve as punishment for serious use of chemical weapons and as a deterrent while keeping the u.s. out of deeper involvement in that country possible war. this according to senior administration officials. the timing of such an attack which would probably last no more than two days and involve -- lawrence cruise missiles and involve see launch cruise is dependent on three factors. completion of an intelligence report assessing syrian government culpability in last week's chemical attack, ongoing consultation with allies in congress, and a determination of the justification under international law. scott wilson joins us by phone now. he is white house bureau chief for the washington post. good morning. insight can you put forth this morning guest: on the administration's thinking it is notbut syria only a matter of if like you a
websites hacked the "washington post" web page just earlier this month. >>> 11 major wildfires are burning in california, by far the most dangerous is the rim fire. the blaze has burned 41,000 acres in the park. that's what you're seeing right there. thousands of nearby homes are threatened, and firefighters are working around the clock. we spent the day with emergency crews on the front line of the rim fire. >> reporter: firefighters are gaining ground. protecting homes, protecting infrastructure such as power plans and the reservoir have been major challenges. the rim fire has become the largest fire in the nation so far this year in a ruthless fire season that has had firefighters hopscotching from incident to incident and from state to state. most firefighters have 24-hour long shifts and they're out here in the mountains whether its fighting the flames on the front lines or protecting buildings which is what they're doing here. the only way they can do this is with the help of multiple logistics teams. it is formerly called the incident command center. some call it face camp. it is se
in washington of lobbyists who are only focused on tax code changes. and they bring a lot of pressure to the committees. so the optimist in my argument is that senators are only put forward changes in the tax code that would be good for most americans if they can put them forth in an anonymous way that would prevent those lobbyists knowing which senator pushed the issue. here is how we know that is a lot of nonsense. this is essentially taxation without representation. that is you are not allowed to see what your senator are putting forward. we know this was the two people putting it forward are arguably the most connected to the k street lobbying. mac baucus was recently called the senator from k street. and as business weak has reported, we basically know that a secrecy system is designed to make sure the proposals approximating put forward, preserve the most publicly embarrassing tax proposal that the average american would despite, but the corporate specialist would want. >> john: you mentioned it has the becoming of max baucus, and the top republican, orewin hatch, huge shock. >>
me, on current tv from our studio on capitol hill in washington, d.c. good to see you this morning and you know how it goes. we will tell you what's going on here in our nation's capital, around the country and around the globe and then we'll open up the phones for your calls at 1-866-55-press. on all of the stories of the day. we'll also look for your comments on twitter. welcome your comments on twitter at bp show and on facebook, become our friend if you're not already, lot going on. president obama coming up to capitol hill yesterday, meeting with house democrats and meeting with senate democrats. where he apparently got a lot of questions about the keystone pipeline and questions about rumors he might consider appointing larry summers, former treasury secretary under bill clinton, appointing larry summers to be the new head of the fed. a lot of members of congress unhappy with that prospect because they had such a terrible time with larry summers when he was treasury secretary. also, on the hill, the nsa came underfire in the senate judiciary commit
. as well as nsa critic congressman justin amash of michigan. >>> then, washington keeps heading for a budget impasse and government shut down. >> we have seen a faction of republicans in congress saying they wouldn't pay the bills congress racked up in the first place. >> instead of working together yesterday the president threatened to shut down the government. >> we'll ask house majority leader eric cantor if they can make a deal before the deadline. all right now on fox news sunday. >>> hello again from fox news in washington. we begin with a terror threat that's prompted the state department to issue a global travel alert for americans and to close almost two dozen embassies and consulates across the muslim world. we are told the al qaeda threat is specific, but the targets are not. chief washington correspondent james rose en has the latest. james? >> reporter: good morning. president obama and his national security team approached this day, the president's 52nd birthday, in a state of apprehension. the u.s. embassy compound in cairo is one of two does then u.s. installatio
are freaking out because washington, d.c.'s city council, passed a living wage bill which could set a new standard nationwide. it would force big box stores to pay $11.75 to workers. it applies only to parent companies making more than $1 billion per year. walmart recorded almost $470 billion in gross sales last year. if walmart allows collective bargaining, it can ignore the wage restriction in d.c. neighborhood leaders say they welcome walmart as long as it pays workers a living wage. >> everybody here is making money except the people who live in washington, d.c. [ applause ] >> if there's going to be prosperity, count us in. count us in. if there's going to be a paycheck, count us in! >> walmart is throwing a multimillion dollar tantrum and threatening to vacate the d.c. area if the bill is signed into law. joining me now, a man who has been fighting forecast workers rights in washington, d.c., reverend graylan hagler. great to have you on the show tonight. thank you for the work you do on behalf of working americans. what do you think is going to do? do you think the mayor will sign
, and gun control. from today's "washington journal." host: we are going to talk now about an interesting issue thanksgiving developing around the country as it relates to state's sovereignty. these are the reactions by states to federal law and what the states are trying to do about it in some cases. our guests this morning at the table are ilya shapiro of the cato institute. he's a senior fellow for constitutional studies, good morning. >> good morning. >> we are also joined by ian millhiser senior constitution policy analyst, appreciate your time. let me try to set this up by reading the beginning part of a politico piece published recently. and the piece says that infuriated by what they see as the long arm of washington reaching into their business, states are increasingly telling the feds keep out. bills that would negate a variety of federal laws have popped up this year in the vast yorte of states with the amount of anti-federal legislation sharply oun the rise during the obama -- sharply on the rise during the obama administration. mr. millhiser, get us started what kind of laws?
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